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  • 1.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Creative Technologies.
    Quantifying usability: an evaluation of a diabetes mHealth system on effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction metrics with associated user characteristics2016In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 5-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Mobile health (mHealth) systems are becoming more common for chronic disease management, but usability studies are still needed on patients' perspectives and mHealth interaction performance. This deficiency is addressed by our quantitative usability study of a mHealth diabetes system evaluating patients' task performance, satisfaction, and the relationship of these measures to user characteristics. Materials and Methods We used metrics in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9241-11 standard. After standardized training, 10 patients performed representative tasks and were assessed on individual task success, errors, efficiency (time on task), satisfaction (System Usability Scale [SUS]) and user characteristics. Results Tasks of exporting and correcting values proved the most difficult, had the most errors, the lowest task success rates, and consumed the longest times on task. The average SUS satisfaction score was 80.5, indicating good but not excellent system usability. Data trends showed males were more successful in task completion, and younger participants had higher performance scores. Educational level did not influence performance, but a more recent diabetes diagnosis did. Patients with more experience in information technology (IT) also had higher performance rates. Discussion Difficult task performance indicated areas for redesign. Our methods can assist others in identifying areas in need of improvement. Data about user background and IT skills also showed how user characteristics influence performance and can provide future considerations for targeted mHealth designs. Conclusion Using the ISO 9241-11 usability standard, the SUS instrument for satisfaction and measuring user characteristics provided objective measures of patients' experienced usability. These could serve as an exemplar for standardized, quantitative methods for usability studies on mHealth systems.

  • 2.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Creative Technologies.
    Using activity theory as a framework for the usability evaluation process and task determination in mhealth self-management systems for diabetes2018In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, IOS Press , 2018, Vol. 249, p. 158-163Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    mHealth systems can be used for patients in their diabetes selfmanagement, but usability evaluations are often needed to determine how to make them more useful for the diabetes patient user in the monitoring and managing of their disease. Activity Theory (AT) was developed within Russian psychology to define the work and activity process in an activity system. AT was here considered to also be a particularly suitable framework for inspiration in usability evaluation both for the whole evaluation process and also for the usability task determination in this process for diabetes patient users. In the following paper, examples are provided from four usability studies using both user-based and expert usability methods in evaluation showing how AT was applied to guide the thoughts in evaluating the usability of two mHealth self-management systems for diabetes. Experiences and insights are provided from this process. © 2018 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Topaz, Maxim
    et al.
    Harvard Medical School, USA.
    Ronquillo, Charlene
    The University of British Columbia, CAN.
    Peltonen, Laura Maria
    Turun yliopisto, FIN.
    Pruinelli, Lisiane
    University of Minnesota Twin Cities, USA.
    Sarmiento, Raymond Francis
    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, USA.
    Badger, Martha
    University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, USA.
    Ali, Samira
    Grand Canyon University, USA.
    Lewis, Adrienne
    Independent Researcher, CAN.
    Georgsson, Mattias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Creative Technologies.
    Jeon, Eunjoo
    Seoul National University, KOR.
    Tayaben, Jude
    Benguet State University, PHL.
    Kuo, Chiuhsiang
    Tzu Chi University of Science and Technology, TWN.
    Islam, Tasneem
    Deakin University, AUS.
    Sommer, Janine
    Scopus - Author details - Sommer, Janine A. Instituto Universitario del Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, ARG.
    Jung, Hyunggu
    University of Washington, USA.
    Eler, Gabrielle
    Federal Institute of Paraná, BRA.
    Alhuwail, Dari
    University of Maryland, USA.
    Lee, Yingli
    National Yang-Ming University, TWN.
    Nurse Informaticians Report Low Satisfaction and Multi-level Concerns with Electronic Health Records: Results from an International Survey2016In: Advances in Printing and Media Technology, ISSN 0892-2284, E-ISSN 1942-597X, Vol. 2016, p. 2016-2025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a qualitative content analysis of nurses' satisfaction and issues with current electronic health record (EHR) systems, as reflected in one of the largest international surveys of nursing informatics. Study participants from 45 countries (n=469) ranked their satisfaction with the current state of nursing functionality in EHRs as relatively low. Two-thirds of the participants (n=283) provided disconcerting comments when explaining their low satisfaction rankings. More than one half of the comments identified issues at the system level (e.g., poor system usability; non-integrated systems and poor interoperability; lack of standards; and limited functionality/missing components), followed by user-task issues (e.g., failure of systems to meet nursing clinical needs; non nursing-specific systems) and environment issues (e.g., low prevalence of EHRs; lack of user training). The study results call for the attention of international stakeholders (educators, managers, policy makers) to improve the current issues with EHRs from a nursing perspective.

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