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  • 1.
    Fredin, Sabrina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    History and geography matter: The cultural dimension of entrepreneurship2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation deals with the rise of new industries through entrepreneurial activities. The aim is to investigate how differences in contexts might encourage or discourage entrepreneurial activities. This contextualization of entrepreneurship enhanced our understanding of when, how and why entrepreneurial activities happen.

    Entrepreneurship is recognized to be a spatially uneven process and, in addition to previous research that has examined the actions of individual entrepreneurs, we also need to understand the context in which entrepreneurship occurs. We have a good understanding of how structural conditions like industry structure, organization structure and agglomeration effects influence the context, but we know little about how the social dimension of the context is the transmitting medium between structural conditions for entrepreneurship and the decision to act upon identified entrepreneurial opportunities. Following this line of argument, this dissertation is built on the assumption that entrepreneurship is a social phenomenon which gives strong arguments for including local culture in entrepreneurship research.

    The temporal persistence and the pronounced differences of culture and structural conditions between places reflect path-dependent processes. I therefore use regional path dependence as an interpretative lens to study the contextualization of entrepreneurship in two Swedish cities.

    Although each context is unique, some generalizations can be drawn from the four individual papers in this dissertation. The first is that industrial legacy leads to the formation of a distinct local culture and that the persistency of this culture influences the subsequent entrepreneurial activities in new local industries. The second is that this persistency of culture suggests that entrepreneurs who are outsiders, geographically or socially, are the driving forces for the emergence of new local industries. Finally, new industry emergence is a result of a combination of exogenous forces and initial local conditions, but it is the entrepreneurial individuals who translate these forces and conditions into entrepreneurial activities.

  • 2.
    Jogmark, Marina
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Den regionala transformationsprocessens sociala dimension: Karlskrona1989-20022015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How can we understand places and their development processes from a social perspective? The aim of this case study is to understand the emergence of an IT-industry in Karlskrona between 1989-2002 from a social capital perspective. Historically, the production and the form of life of the population in Karlskrona, has been characterized by the fact that Karlskrona is a naval city, which for several centuries has had a naval base and a naval ship yard. Karlskrona is also an interesting case to study because of the stagnation in the economy and the insignificant prospects for industrial renewal in the late 1980s. Despite these conditions, something happens that for a short period of time changes the local structure both in terms of production and population. How can we understand the social dimension of such a change?

    In a narrated form this case study highlights how the transformation of Karlskrona contain both bridging and bonding forms of social relations. The main purpose of this dissertation is accordingly to understand which networks of relations the key participants of the study are a part of and get resources from. The study also aim to highlight structures for action around the development of the IT-industry in relation to the ties that bind in the already established industrial specialization in Karlskrona, in other words the lasting relationships tied to the naval base, the navy and the naval yard. From this viewpoint questions are asked regarding what kind of social relations appear, both in the new and the old Karlskrona, and what it is in particular that characterizes the new social capital that makes up the key participants room to manoeuvre in the process of transformation for Karlskrona.

     

    The phenomenon where the place Karlskrona appears as socially divided between exchanges within the context of the new and the already established industry, is illustrated as two pillars of social capital. The pillars are assumed to be separated at the beginning of the transformation, and then they change as people live their lives and are included in new types of exchanges with each other. From the case specific study of the transformation of Karlskrona between 1989-2002, other, more general analytical connections are made in the discussion about how the dynamics of the transformation could be made possible, and why it stopped. From the theoretical viewpoint of social capital the dissertation follows a discussion about the lessons which can be learnt regarding the question how we can view places and their transformation processes. The conclusions particularly emphasize the importance of how newcomers can contribute as well as the crucial role held by border crossers when it comes to

    create linking social capital of the place.

  • 3.
    Popova, Anna
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Addressing retail vacancy in city centers of Gelderland: what can be learned from the Province of Antwerpen?2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, downtown shopping areas have faced a number of challenges, which have undermined their vitality and viability. Some scholars argue that the coincidence of long-term shifts in policies, demographic recomposition and mobility increase and medium- and short-term impacts of changes in business and consumers’ behavior has had negative impact on the economic performance of city center shopping areas. There is an increasing interest in retail vacancy in city centers as it reflects the declining performance of the shopping areas.Retail vacancy is a complex and extensive problem. It is associated with numerous issues such as neglect and under-utilization of space, and is often considered undesirable. Vacancy can lead to decay and dilapidation of the area, but also attracts crime and can thereby result in disadvantaged neighborhoods. In addition, vacancy is also undesirable in the context of a sustainable and efficient use of space. Due to the fact that retail vacancy affects not only economic performance of retailers, but also the area itself, the public space, and, therefore has a spatial characteristics, local and regional authorities are involved in the process of addressing the issue.The thesis aims at identifying different policy arrangements for addressing retail vacancy in Antwerpen province (Belgium) and analyzing their transferability to the institutional settings of the Gelderland province (the Netherlands). This research contributes to the existing academic literature on the retail vacancy by filling the existing gap and giving insights in policy arrangements and institutional environment of the issue in international comparative perspective.

  • 4.
    SARACENO, PIER PAOLO
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    THE INTEGRATED TERRITORIAL INVESTMENT (ITI) AS A TOOL FOR GOVERNING THE RURALURBAN LINKAGES: EVIDENCE FROM POLAND2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The growing awareness of functional linkages between rural and urban territories has led to a re-thinking of the rural-urban dichotomy. This was flanked by a more general reconceptualization of space, directly coming from the rise of spatial planning and the shifting process from government to governance. Thus, the concept of “soft space” came to the fore, defined as the space of governance and integrated approach. The EU Commission has launched a new instrument aimed at fostering the territorial approach of the new Cohesion Policy, namely the Integrated Territorial Investment (ITI). This research wants to investigate the added value of the ITI instrument in governing and institutionalizing the rural-urban linkages at the metropolitan level. In doing so, the author has created a conceptual framework based on three main concepts directly coming from the concept of soft space, namely institutionalization, governance capacity, and integrated approach. The empirical study is focused on Poland, in particular, dealing with the case of Warsaw, Krakow, and Wroclaw. As a result, this research argues that the ITI in Poland has represented an attempt to improve the cooperation between capital cities and their surrounding areas, even though its outcomes can be questionable.

  • 5.
    Svensson, Martin
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    When being wrong might be right: on overconfidence as an evolutionary mechanism of nascent entrepreneurs2015In: Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Global Economy: Knowledge, Technology and Internationalization / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Urban Gråsjö and Sofia Wixe, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 237-258Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical regularities regarding start-ups that do not show prolonged longevity have been known for some time. In this chapter, the regularity is argued to originate from an interaction between cognition-laden characteristics of entrepreneurs and contextual conditions. Overconfidence is argued to cause miscalibration of objective probabilities of success, which in turn causes excess entry, but also to negatively affect survival rates. Moreover, overconfidence is argued to be an evolutionary mechanism that helps explain the distribution of entrepreneurs at the local level. It does so by advocating overconfident entrepreneurs to be more likely to beacon personal, but miscalibrated, beliefs to others and thereby set off spillover effects. The bias is therefore argued to be detrimental to actors at an individual level (as it negatively affects survival rates), but favorable at the system level (as it facilitates spillover effects). The concluding discussion of these matters is extended by a discussion of policy issues.

  • 6.
    Van de Vijver, Johan
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    Contributions from the European Union to the development of Brainport Eindhoven: A case study on the contribution of the projects from development programmes and initiatives to the development of the innovation system of Brainport.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the Brainport region, many different projects take place in the framework of EU co-financed programmes and initiatives. Between the different programmes and initiatives, these projects all have a different way to contribute to this development. Firstly, all projects contribute to the activities of organisations in the region. The subsidy that is linked to the projects gives the organisations in the region extra financial capacity, which allows organisations to do something extra besides their regular activities. The relations within Brainport are also very much developed with contributions of the projects of the EU programmes and initiatives. The projects in all programmes had an emphasis on connecting different organisations with each other and the development of new ecosystems. Therefore, especially the network dimension is developed thanks to the EU co-financed projects. The institutions in the region are almost undeveloped by the projects, because the projects have a duration period that is too small to contribute to this. Although some projects instigate the development of knowledge, this is to a far smaller degree than the instigation of entrepreneurial activities, because knowledge is used in the project as a means to do entrepreneurial activities. 

  • 7.
    van den Boogaard, Lucas
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    I amSMARTerdam: Revaluating the Smart City concept through the world's most bottom-up Smart City2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Smart Cities are, while hot-and-happening, in the field of urban planning, also a source of confusionand debate. While many argue against the technology-driven and top-down nature of the Smart Citymodel, the bottom-up component is often appointed as the deciding factor in the determinationwhether a Smart City can be successful and contributing to its set goals, or rather resulting in an effortharming the city and its citizens in the long run. This thesis set out to explore the bottom-upcomponent in one of the most revered and most bottom-up Smart Cities of the world, Amsterdam.Remarkably, the research has proven that Amsterdam Smart City, even though it is often seen as oneof the good examples, suffers from the same issues. Its initiatives are an amalgamation of subjectsthat hardly seem to fit under the smart narrative as propagated by Amsterdam Smart City and hardlyany initiatives can be considered truly bottom-up. If one of the prime examples fails to adhere to itsown standards, what does this mean for the concept of smart cities?

  • 8.
    Álvarez, Guillermo
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    UNDERSTANDING DEVELOPMENT FROM TWO DIFFERENT INNOVATION PERSPECTIVES: The Life Sciences cluster in Lund2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This Master Thesis hinges on the concept of Innovation and its association with regional development as a phenomenon that has attracted both researchers and policy makers’ attention.  The thesis presents two different innovation perspectives on regional development – Innovation Systems and Complex Systems of Innovation, and applies them into the case-study of the Life Sciences Cluster in Lund.

    In order to do so, the key aspects of each of the perspectives are highlighted within the part devoted to the Framework of this thesis. Within these, the networks between organizations in the Innovation Systems and the actors and their interrelations in the Complex Systems perspective have been analyzed.

    The analysis of these aspects brings up similar outcomes in both perspectives applied, i.e. the creation of various organizations within the Cluster. Both of the perspectives account for the importance of Lund University for the creation of these organizations and subsequent development of the Life Sciences cluster.

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