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  • 1.
    KARAOULANIS, ANDREAS
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    MONFORT, FREDERIC
    A comparative study of women in top managerial positions in Greece and the United Kingdom(UK)2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Problem formulation: The main research questions of this comparative study are as follow: How does the Maculinity Index (MAS), which is similar in both UK and Greece, express itself inside organisations, in terms of culture (norms, values)? How can this help to understand the differences found in the representations of women in both countries?

    Purpose: The purpose of why this study was contacted is to describe several MAS expressions in the organisational culture in order to find out how these expressions can help us understand the differences in female representation in both countries (UK and Greece).

    Literature: The main literature, upon which the whole study s was based upon, is the Hofstede’s cultural dimensions theory as described in:

     

    1. Hofstede, G. 2014. Cultural Tools: Country Comparison. [Online]. Available at: <http://geert-hofstede.com/countries.html> [Accessed: 13th January 2015], and

     

    1. Hofstede, G., Hofstede, G. J. & Minkov, M. 2010. Cultures and organizations: Software of the mind. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

     

    Numerous literature sources were used throughout this thesis, which can be found in references.

     

    Method: The authors used the case study approach for this research as described in Yin’s “Case Study Research: Design and Methods. 5th Ed.” (2014). The main methods used for the collection of the empirical findings were documentation, interviews, informal discussions and archival records.

     

    Key findings: The major findings of this research indicated that at Alpha Bank, the male dominated powerful “in- groups”, by framing the recruitment and the selection process, by recruiting mainly male friends and relatives,  reproducing the male dominated culture inside the company. At Tata Steel, the masculine organisational culture was mainly the results of gender role norms associating STEM disciplines and leadership with masculinity. Some women were perceived to violate their femininity when being assertive or holding traditionally male positions. In addition, the “double burden syndrome” was considered to be an important barrier to women’s career advancement in Britain whereas it was not affecting Greek women as much due to the collectivistic characteristics of the Greek societal culture with parents usually helping their daughters and daughters-in-law with baby-sitting and in-house “obligations”.

  • 2.
    Salomonsson, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Computing, Department of Technology and Aesthetics.
    Leveling-Up With Cultural Heritage: Aspects from Gamification and Alternate Reality Games2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores how heritage museums can engage more visitors to take part of cultural heritage in context to digital culture, and going deeper in on what implementation of gamification and alternate reality games can contribute with. Through the establishment of how the heritage museum space has changed since the implementation of technology, gives a response concerning new perspective in the experience economy. Connecting Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s characteristics of flow together with Jane McGonigal’s theory of alternate gaming can serve the visitor to invest in their own learning outcomes, thus invest more in cultural heritage. Nevertheless also how visitors can experience cultural heritage as one but at the same time as a community, participating through a common ‘goal’.   

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